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Humility and Compassion August 28, 2016

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Luke 14:1-14

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost

August 28, 2016

 

Focus:  God humbled Himself, taking on flesh, to die for us.

Function:  That the hearers care for others.

Structure:  Walking through the text.

 

Humility and Compassion

 

Sometimes when you read a text from Scripture, it just doesn’t seem to go together.  And our text from the gospel according to Luke today is just like that.  You can read it through and hear Jesus teach things, but they seem disconnected.  We have a healing on the Sabbath, and then some teaching on being humble, and it closes with some advice about who we should invite into our homes and spend our time with.

So at first we wonder what Luke is doing.  Why did he put these three things right next to each other?  But as we reflect on the text, we can see that Luke didn’t actually put these things together, Jesus did.  They all happened at the same time, one right after the other.

So then we wonder why Jesus is all over the board here, bouncing from one topic to another so quickly.  And this is why it’s truly helpful to read, mark, and inwardly digest the Word of God.  Too many believe that once you’ve read it once, you never need to read it again.  This isn’t some awful movie that you watch once and never want to see again.  It’s more like your favorite film, something like a Sound of Music or a Star Wars, where you want to see it time and time again.  And I know there are probably several people here who could sing that musical soundtrack without any help at all.  And yet, you still enjoy them.

The depth of Scripture is unparalleled.  You can read the same text every day for the rest of your life and you’ll still be learning, still growing in your understanding of how God is saving His people.

And so we look at our text from Luke again today, and a little closer.   Look at each of the three paragraphs, the three sections, and notice how they begin.

In the first paragraph, the very start of this chapter, we see that Jesus has been invited into the home of a Pharisee to eat with him and his other guests.  This, as it turns out, is the same context for the rest of our reading.  He’s not going anywhere.  It’s the same people, the same meal.

Now we’re not given a time, but at some point early in Jesus’ time in the house, He sees a man who has dropsy, which according to Mayo, is intense swelling of the hands, feet, and other limbs.  This man is clearly sick, his life deeply impacted by this illness and the limitations it presents.  And Jesus sees Him, and does what?  What’s His response?

Notice it isn’t immediately healing him.  Which makes you wonder if this sick man was there of his own doing, or if this was all a set up by the Pharisees to trap Jesus into breaking the Sabbath again.  Because instead of just healing him, Jesus begins to question, to teach, those around Him.  “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath, or not?”

And they respond with silence.  Silence, so as to allow Jesus to continue on, to just do what they knew He would.  Heal the man so we can cast you out.  And so He does, He heals the sick man and sends him away, and then goes right back to teaching, to challenging these Pharisees and lawyers.  “Which of you, having a son or an ox that has fallen into a well on a Sabbath day, will not immediately pull him out?”

It’s their trap, but Jesus spins it back on them, and traps them with it.  They don’t know how to respond.  In fact, they do know how to respond, but it proves them wrong, and so they keep their mouths shut once again.  We see a lot from Jesus here.  We see His compassion for the sick, but also His compassion for the misguided.  Because He’s teaching them, and He stays around.

You see the text continues.  Jesus remained in the house, and we watched others, He watched the guests take their place at the owner’s table.  And how each wanted the seats of honor, likely the seats right by the host.  Or maybe for you, the seat at the wedding reception table that gets to go get their food first!  But Jesus sees the pride of these people, how they seek after, covet the affections, the attention, the gifts of the guy throwing the party.

And so He counters them, again, teaching.  He tells them the parable of the wedding feast.  If you seat yourself in a seat of honor, what will happen if someone else arrives that the master of the banquet wants to give that honor?  He will ask you to move, and you will walk away embarrassed, ashamed, to the lowest place as most of the other seats are already filled.  But if you humble yourself, shed that ego, think less of yourself, and sit at the lowest place, what will happen?  Maybe nothing, you just end up sitting there, enjoy the party, meet some new people.  Or maybe, the master of the banquet singles you out, and raises you up, asking you to sit near him.  Rather than being embarrassed, you’ll be built up, encouraged, your relationship with the master grows all the more.

So He’s spoken to the religious leaders, and then to the guests at large at this party, and then the third paragraph here we come back to see Him address the man who invited Him, presumably, the owner of the house.

And again, He teaches.  He teaches this man who to invite.  He tells him not to invite friends, family, or wealthy neighbors.  Why?  Because they’ll pay him back.  They’ll return the favor.  Instead, he’s encouraged to invite those who can’t invite him back, those who can’t return the favor.  The poor, crippled, lame, and blind.   These people can’t give him anything because they don’t have anything.  He’s encouraging him to spend his time with the least of these.

And so as we dig deeper into this context, we do start to see how these three teachings all fit together.  It’s not three unconnected events.  It’s not even just three teachable moments for the Christ.  It is a series on compassion and humility in a place where compassion and humility were gravely absent.

We see a man in need of compassion, and the leaders refuse to give it to him.  They remain in their ego-filled high place, while this man with dropsy is looked down upon.  Christ comes along, has compassion upon him, heals his sickness, and sends him off back into his life.

We see this same message of humility then shared with the guests.  That rather than thinking too highly of themselves, they should be as servants, taking the lowest place, that they might receive honor and be lifted up.

And then to the host himself, Christ again speaks of compassion and humility.  The host’s home is filled with egos.  It’s filled with people seeking to glorify themselves and who look down on others.  So Jesus encourages this man to have compassion on the ones they look down on.  To care for the sick.  To befriend the lame.  To feed the poor.  This may not glorify you in the eyes of the world, certainly not the Pharisees, but it brings glory to God in heaven.  And maybe, just maybe, that repayment at the resurrection has something to do with seeing the least of these at the heavenly feast.

“For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.”  This is Christ.  Let’s recall your catechetical instruction.   We talk about Christ as having two states.  What are they?  The state of humiliation and the state of exaltation.  And which came first?  As we plow through the creed, “came down from heaven…incarnate….made man…crucified also for us…suffered and was buried.”  These things, that Christ took on flesh, came into this world to conquer sin, death, and the devil.  Not a champion rider on a horse bringing destruction, but as a humble servant willing to lay down His life for His friends.

And that’s precisely what He did.  He laid down His life for all of us.  Christ died upon that cross that we might live.  He died that we wouldn’t have to die.  God died for you.  That’s humble.  And in the most embarrassing of ways, asphyxiated to death in front of the world to see.

But then out of this humility the Father in heaven exalted His Son: “rose again according to the Scriptures and ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of the Father.  And He will come again with glory to judge both the living and the dead, whose kingdom will have no end.”  Whoever humbles himself will be exalted.  Christ was exalted, all the way to the right hand of the Father in heaven.

And so Christ comes to teach, to share what compassion and humility look like.  Many times I hear that sermons need to always spell out the application.  What does this text look like in my life?  Why should it matter to me?  I admit, I don’t often do that.  And I know it.  It’s intentional that I leave it out.  I want you to be able to hear the Word of God and to be able to figure out how it applies on your own.  That’s part of maturity in our faith.

With that said, it’s still good for me to give you the applications from time to time, as a guide, as an example, to help you in your ability to see how the Spirit works through His Word today.  And this text is quite simple.  It’s the same message Christ was teaching to the people then.

Have compassion on others.  Don’t look down upon them because they’re not like you.  For example, don’t look down upon an entirely different generation because they don’t seem to have life figured out like you do.  Have compassion, get to know them, walk alongside them, teach them.  But also be humble and realize there’s much they can teach you as well.

It’s also a good reminder for us to care for the least of these.  This isn’t just helping with charity events like Channel One or Feed My Starving Children.  Those are good things, helpful things.  But in your daily life, finding ways to invite others into your home who are hungry, or lonely, or grieving.

A great example of this is major holidays, times like Thanksgiving, Christmas, or Easter.   Go around your neighborhood and invite your neighbors to celebrate those days at your table.  Most will turn you down, having a place to go already.  But you may find someone who doesn’t, a widow marking her first Christmas alone.  A young couple a thousand miles away from home and the only family they know.  A man who looks so rich but is actually poor because of all the debt he has taken on trying to be something he’s not.  And you don’t have to wait for the holidays.  Invite someone over this weekend.

That’s just a couple of an endless number of examples you could come up with about compassion and humility.  But we also remember that it’s not by our compassion or our humility that we earn our salvation.  Christ has already done that for us.

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