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A Guide to Loving Your Enemies February 19, 2017

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Matthew 5:38-48

Seventh Sunday after Epiphany

February 19, 2017

 

Focus:  God saves even His own enemies.

Function:  That the hearers love their enemies and pray for those who persecute them.

Structure:  Walking through the text.

 

A Guide to Loving Your Enemies

 

As we gathered together here in this place last week, to hear of God’s love for us, and to receive the forgiveness of all our sins, I was privileged to share with you from the Sermon on the Mount. More specifically, to look at what Jesus is doing with this middle section of the sermon.

Do you remember which use of the Law we talked about?  2nd use/mirror use.  Jesus said that if we just had more righteousness than the Pharisees, we could enter the kingdom of heaven.  But then, He takes the Law as we know it, and He cranks it up, He raises the bar to levels beyond our capability.

Jesus uses the Law to show us our sin.  Jesus uses the Law to crush us, to destroy us, to bring about confession, repentance of our sins.  But it’s not just that.  That would be twisted and deranged.  Christ doesn’t kill us and leave us.  He kills us, and then He makes us alive again, in Him.

This is the beauty of both law and gospel.  That they work together.  The law kills, the gospel makes alive.  Without the mirror in their faces, the people didn’t know their sin, they didn’t know their need for a Savior.  But once they did, He didn’t scoff at them, but He died for them.

But today, as we continue to look at the Sermon on the Mount, I want to focus in more on the first and the third uses of the Law.  Which again, are what? Curb and guide.

So our gospel reading today started with an all familiar Old Testament teaching.

38 “You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’

If your neighbor kills your ox, you take one of his.  If an enemy lops off your hand, you lop off one of his.  If someone kills your wife, you don’t kill their wife, you simply kill them, a life for a life.

And so just like what we saw with murder, adultery, divorce, and oaths last week, the next words out of Jesus’ mouth radically change our thinking, our concept of what the law even means.

39 But I say to you, Do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. 40 And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. 41 And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles.42 Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you.

 

The curb use of the law is rather simple with this one.  It’s so civilization, continues.  If we were always dealing out justice in this way, exacting revenge as described earlier, there would be no end.  There would be nothing left.

The guide use of the law is also rather simple.  It’s do what Jesus said.  If they take out your eye, offer the other, too.  If they bust your tooth, offer an extra.  If they slap one cheek, turn the other to them in case they want another shot.  If they sue you for your clothes, give them more.

Jesus actually takes a law that they understood as a law of revenge and violence, and turns it into a law of reckless generosity.  That we would give of ourselves fully.  The Greek words behind the clothing illustrate that.  Your tunic would be like the long johns you’ve been wearing all winter, and your cloak would be the outer layer.  What was left?

This is one of the places of great of benefit to those of you who are single.  You can be recklessly generous without having to worry about also then caring for and providing for a spouse or children.  I’m quite certain that’s part of Paul’s conversation, and Christ’s as well later in Matthew, as they lift up the gift of celibacy as a true spiritual gift within the church.

But as we saw last week, we see again here.  The mirror use of the Law smacks us in the face.  It shows us that we haven’t done these things.  We haven’t been recklessly generous with the time, treasure, and talents that God has entrusted to us.  We haven’t been willing to give to those who would first see us harmed.  And again, if this were all the Law was, we’d be damned.

One of the things Christ pointed to was that part about going the extra mile.  It wasn’t uncommon then for a Roman soldier to simply, forcibly, ask someone to carry their load for them.  They even did it to Christ.  Forcing Him to carry the burden of their cross up to the top of the mount where they would then hang Him on it.

Bearing their sins, not only up the mountain, but bearing them on His shoulders straight to the judgment throne of God.  Where your sins and my sins are what caused His death.  He literally went the extra distance for us.  And on His account, all of our sins are gone, wiped clean, forgiven, and His righteousness then fills us.  The love of Christ is ours now and forevermore.

And then Jesus, in much the same way, does the same thing with our next piece.

43 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’

Now, if you remember our Old Testament reading from earlier, what’s wrong with that statement?  It’s not what the Bible says.  Somewhere along the way, the phrase was added to.  The hate for one’s enemy isn’t even in Leviticus, which we all know has a bad reputation to those outside the church.  If we’re honest, even to most in the church.

But, nonetheless, it doesn’t matter.  It doesn’t matter if the Pharisees had added it, or the Sanhedrin, or the Sadducees, or some other group.  Jesus is about to obliterate it anyway.

44 But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. 46 For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? 47 And if you greet only your brothers, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same?

 

The curb use of the law with this one, again, it’s pretty straight forward.  Don’t kill your enemy.  Don’t wage war. Don’t commit genocide.

And that brings us again to the guide use of the Law here.  Again, it’s simply stated, although, hard to do.  Love your enemies.  Pray for those who persecute you.  I’m going to put this out there, and just let you dwell on it this week.  Can you love your enemy by killing him in war?  If you want to discuss it further with me privately later, we definitely can, but just chew on it for now.

Here is where we are thankful for men and women like the Gayed family.  For the work being done through POBLO, not only here in Rochester, but in much of the world.  As people overcome their fears to share the good news of Jesus Christ with those who need to hear it.

Go, even if it’s just once, go volunteer once, just so you can see it done.  Let them lead you by example.  We are quick to think of Islam as our enemy, even an enemy that would see us dead.  And in some ways, that’s very true.  John could share stories with you that would break your heart.  But then, he would also share stories with you that would encourage you, that would convince you that it’s all worth it.

Because even our enemies, whether they could simply care less about us, or they truly disdain us, even our enemies are creations of God.  And it is for them that Christ came and died upon the cross, just as much as it was for all of us.

And I know I fail at this one.  I know I let anger become the first response, rather than say, compassion or sorrow, when someone opposes Christ and His truths.  But I’m ever so thankful for the forgiveness of my sins that comes through gospel of Jesus.

8but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.Since, therefore, we have now been justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God. 10 For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by his life. (Romans 5:8-10)

 

While we were enemies of God, He sent His Son to die for us, for them.  Jesus died to forgive the sins of all people.  And those verses are an excellent reminder to me to be humble, to not consider myself better than others, because I too, was once an enemy of God deserving nothing but His wrath.

But instead, He chose to spare me.  He chose to spare you.  Through the faithful work of our families, our churches, our communities, that Word of forgiveness, of life, of love, that Word has been shared with you, has taken root in you, has changed you, transformed you from an enemy of God, into a child of God.

And as Paul taught the young pastor Timothy in 1 Timothy 2:4, that’s the outcome God would like to see for all of His creation.

Although we’re not even half way through the Sermon yet, the last verse of our text today reads:

48 You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.

 

Some see that as a challenge.  Some see it as a challenge to be met.  I have to do this, and they strive for perfection their entire life long.  Perfection becomes their God, the desire of their heart.  Others hear that challenge as overwhelming, as something they could never achieve, and then despair becomes their God, as they give up all hope.

But for you and for me, and truly for all people, the verse isn’t a challenge for us at all.  It is the full killing weight of the Law.  You’ve failed.  But Christ has made you alive.  He has fulfilled that Law.  He has been perfect as our Heavenly Father is perfect.  He has then taken His perfection, and given it to you.  That’s the beauty of Christ’s imputed righteousness.  It’s 100% free to you.

 

 

 

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Exceeding the Righteousness of the Pharisees February 12, 2017

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Matthew 5:21-37

Sixth Sunday after the Epiphany

February 12th, 2017

 

Focus:  God imputes His righteousness to us through His Son Jesus Christ.

Function:  That the hearers look to Christ for their righteousness, not to themselves.

Structure:  Walking through the Scriptures.

 

Exceeding the Righteousness of the Pharisees

 

Today’s gospel reading, isolated from its context, wouldn’t be gospel at all.  These words kill.  Alone, they don’t even kill and make alive.  These words simply kill.

So we need the context.  We need the assigned gospel reading from last weekend for these words flowing from the lips of Christ to make any sense whatsoever.  So, feel free to open up your Bibles to Matthew chapter 5.  This is the section following the eight fold blessing of the Beatitudes, and it’s immediately following those analogies about being the salt and light of the earth, the city on a hill that can’t be hidden.  But we start today with verse seventeen:

17 “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18 For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. 19 Therefore whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. 20 For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

 

Christ’s reference to the Law and the Prophets is the phrase they used to describe the Old Testament.  Those are the two sections the Jewish people broke it down into. He didn’t come to remove the law of God from creation.  Christ came not to do away with the Law, but to follow it perfectly for us.  Not even the smallest mark.  Not the smallest letter, not the slightest ink from a pen would be removed from the Law until it’s fulfilled.

The Law of God is His will for His people.  We are to keep it, to follow it.  And this, this is where the Pharisees come in.  They loved the law.  They harped on it all the time.  Do the law. You gotta keep the law if you want God’s love.  Do, do, do, and do some more.  Unless it’s the Sabbath, then you do by doing nothing.

But here’s the kicker, and it’s the kicker of this whole sermon.  How much righteousness did the Pharisees actually have?  None.  The law they kept was a law of their own making, they cared not for God or His people.  It was selfish, self-serving, self-promoting, and the people listening to Jesus knew it.  And so now Jesus tells them that their righteousness must exceed that of the Pharisees if they ever want to enter the kingdom of heaven.

Sounds easy, right?  If the Pharisees have no righteousness, it should be easy to get just a smidge, just an ounce.  That’s all it would take to get into heaven.  But that’s what the rest of our gospel reading today is about.  How are you doing?  How much righteousness do you have?  None.

That’s a hard truth for us to hear, especially if we’ve never heard it before.  We aren’t righteous.  That’s one of the uses of the Law.  Curb, mirror, and guide.  That’s the 2nd use, the mirror use of the Law.  It shows us our sin.  And that’s what Christ is up to in the text.

He’s going to take the Law as they knew it, the Law as the Pharisees knew it and taught it.  He’s going to take that Law and ramp it up.  Crank the nastiness factor of the Law to the top notch.  Take the killing, destructive force of the Law, and blow it up to epic proportions.  To prove to you that you can’t keep it.  On your own, you’re dead in your trespasses. And we’ll circle back to that, but first, let’s look at what He does.

21 “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.’

 

That’s what we know as the fifth commandment.  It’s a direct citation from Exodus 20:13, and also from Deuteronomy.  You shall not kill, or murder.  Well, okay Jesus, that’s easy enough.  I’ve never killed anyone.  Except, then Jesus elaborates on what that Law means.

22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire.

 

Go ahead and put your hands up on this one.  C’mon, everybody put a hand up.  Now, if you’ve ever been angry at anyone, put your hand down.  If you’ve cursed someone or wished bad against them, put your hand down.  If you’ve ever insulted someone put your hand down.  How are we doing?  How many of us made it?  How many of us before the righteousness of God, the perfection of God, how many of us can stand?

That’s the thrust of what Jesus is doing, and He’s going to do it again and again and again before He’s done.  He’s hammering it home.  This point will be made known to all people.  Now, He does follow each of these things with a little life application that shows you just how serious He is about it.  Just how important these things are.

23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.

 

So for this one, just as an example, if you know you’re not reconciled to your brother, and that’s not just your flesh and blood brother, but your brothers and sisters in Christ, you could even say your neighbor.  If you’re not reconciled with someone, put your offering down, and leave.  Get up out of the service, and go be reconciled.  And then, when you are, come back, and offer your offering before the Lord.  Would the church ever receive another dime?

And here, it’s the same with the next one.  Jesus cites the sixth commandment from Exodus 20:14.  But He ramps it up.

27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already committed adultery with her in his heart.

 

Don’t worry, you don’t have to raise your hands this time, well, as long as it’s not still up already.  Adultery is the physical act of having sex with someone who is not your spouse.  Your “one flesh” for life.  Oh, well, that’s not so bad.  Most of us can do that.  Except, no, we can’t.  The NASB translation renders lustful intent as simply the word “desire.”  Any time you’ve made an object of someone.  Any time you’ve dabbled in pornography, whether that’s visual or even in the form of written words.  Whenever you’ve so much as crushed on someone else.  That moment they are seen in your eyes or your heart or your mind as anything but a child of God, a creation of the King, in that very moment, you’re goose is cooked.  You’ve committed adultery in your heart.

And how serious is it? V. 29-30 make that crystal clear.

29 If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body be thrown into hell. 30 And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body go into hell.

 

The pain, the death, the affliction of sin is so bad, you’d be better off without whatever limb is causing you to sin, than to burn in hell for the punishment for your thoughts, words, and deeds.  But that’s just it.  What would be left of you?  We are sinful through and through.  Not just your eyes, or your hands, but your mind, your heart.  All of you, cut off.

And this just continues.  Divorce, oaths, eye for an eye, love your enemy, giving, praying, fasting, treasuring, worrying, judging, asking, how you treat others, bearing fruit, etc.  It just goes on.

You thought you could do these things, well, you can’t.  None of them.  You aren’t good enough.  You aren’t capable.  You can’t keep the Law.  Your righteousness is one and the same as that of the Pharisees, it’s like a puddle of vomit.  And that’s the point.

Again, let’s re-read verse seventeen.

17 “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.

 

Christ came to fulfill the Law.  Christ came to live the Law that you and I can’t.  And He did.  That’s what this whole sermon is about.  That’s it not about you, but that it’s about Him.  We have these great terms in Lutheran theology, and this one is called 2KR, or two kinds of righteousness.  Everything we’ve talked about, all of Christ’s examples are called horizontal righteousness, it’s how you live out your life, how you love your neighbor.  But the righteousness Christ calls us to have isn’t this.  Even if you could do it, it wouldn’t be enough.  It’s the vertical righteousness, that is, our standing before God, our faith.  This is what Christ calls us to.

And on our own we can’t do it.  And that’s okay, because it’s not ours to do.  Christ lived out the Law for you.  He kept it perfectly, breaking not even a single command in thirty plus years.  He achieved the horizontal righteousness that we failed to achieve.

And then, then He went and achieved the vertical righteousness as well.  He took our broken relationship with God upon His own self.  By the blood of Christ shed upon the cross, your punishment is paid.  Your lack of righteousness forgiven.  And by His resurrection from the dead on the third day, the Son of God, Christ our Lord has done more than give you a second chance.  He’s given you a life that never ends.  A life that can’t be taken from you.  It’s His gift to you.  He’s earned it, and now He’s giving it freely.

A recent analogy I heard explains this really well.  We could take a chalkboard and just fill it with sins.  Your sins, my sins, past, present, even future.  And we tend to think that as Christians, when God forgives our sins, He wipes the board clean, gives us a clean slate to try again.  But that misses the truth entirely.

Christ not only wipes our board clean, He then fills it with Himself.  This is called Christ’s imputed righteousness.  That righteousness He demanded of us before the Pharisees isn’t even ours, it’s His.  He wipes our sins away and then fills us with His own righteousness, bought and paid for by Him.  It’s not up to us.  It’s not our doing.  It’s His.

And so we look back to the very first words from Christ’s mouth as He began this Sermon on the Mount.

5:4 “Blessed are the poor in Spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”

That’s you.  That’s me.  And we are blessed, because God has given us everything in and through His Son Jesus Christ.   Forgiveness, peace, life, righteousness, all yours.  And they’re all gifts.

 

Children’s message based on keeping the Law.  Maybe the 4th commandment of honoring mother and father.  Maybe one of Christ’s Sermon on the Mount examples instead.  We can’t do it.  But Christ can.  And He has.  And He’d done it for us.